Support: Glossary

1.6 GPF

Maximum amount of water allowed by law in the United States to flush the toilet, or 1.6 gallons per flush. (Federal law since 1994).

ADA

Stands for the American Disabilities Act and has become known as "Handicap" or "Comfort Fit" toilets.

Bolt Caps

Decorative, color-coded caps that cover the bolts that hold the toilet bowl down to the floor.

Flapper

Mounted on the flush valve and keeps the water in the tank until flushed.

Flush Valve

This is the valve that contains the flapper and the overflow tube.

High Efficiency Toilet (HET)

Any toilet that averages or surpasses 1.28 gallons per flush.

Lid

The removable top of the tank. The underside of the lid will usually contain the model number of the lid and the date of manufacture.

One-piece vs. two-piece

The one piece toilet is a self-contained unit whereas the two piece unit has a tank that is bolted to the bowl to form the complete toilet.

Refill Tube

Small diameter rubber hose that goes from the ballcock to the overflow tube. This hose supplies the water to the toilet bowl after flushing. There should be no "kinks" in this hose.

Rim Jet

Holes under the rim of the toilet bowl that direct the water down the sides of the bowl during flushing and refill. Check periodically with a 6d nail or 10 guage wire to ensure they are not clogged with chemical deposits (hard water).

Rough-in

The measurement from the "finished wall" to the center of the drain (center of the bolts holding the bowl down). This is normally 12" but can be special ordered in the 10" and 14" models.

Seat

The actual seat that you sit on.

Tank

Contains the water used to flush the toilet and refill the bowl. The model number and date of manufacture will normally be located on the inside back wall of the tank near the water line.

Trip Lever

Located on the outside of the tank and is used to actuate the flush valve to initiate the flushing cycle. The chain or strap going from the handle assembly should have no more than 1/4" of slack to keep the flapper from closing prematurely.

Water Control Valve

Usually referred to as the "Ballcock." This is the valve that controls the water coming into the tank and turns on when flushed and off when the water is up to the "waterline" mark inside the tank.

Water Supply Valve

This is the valve located near the floor that supplies water to the ballcock/water control valve. This valve should be fully open at all times except for maintenance.

Wax Ring

Located between the bowl and the floor flange to provide a water-tight connection to the soil drain (sewer).